Sunday, 20 August 2017

Mytholmroyd Tree - A Poem by Suzi Taylor
















Just off the A646 outside of Mythomroyd, a rather unusual tree can be seen in a field backing onto the heathery fringes of Midgley Moor.  




 

When poet Suzi Taylor got up to read at a recent open mic poetry event at Hebden Bridge's Fox and Goose, and introduced her poem as being "about a tree in Mytholmroyd," I - like most others in the pub, as it turned out - anticipated that it would be this achromatic, snowy skeleton that was featured.  Paying homage to the tree's apparent death mask / of unequalled beauty, Suzi's poem articulates in stark, elegant language the solitary splendour of the antique tree.

I have passed this tree dozens, scores, maybe hundreds of times, walking back from Mytholmroyd, or zipping by in cars and making casual references to its unique appearance.  I have stood and observed it from afar, and - prompted by Suzi's poem - taken a closer look, drawn into its dreamy pallor, as it scrapes the sky like the rickety totem pole of some fairytale tribe.



I will hand over to Suzi here, who depicts the unique quality of this bleakly beautiful entity better than I could, and ends with a rousing message to all poets!
Mytholmroyd tree

I have long since admired
your bare beauty
Naked and proud
unlike the others
huddling together
for comfort

You stand alone
Unafraid
With apparent death mask
of unequalled beauty
almost white against the blue
is how I most enjoy your company

If you could talk
what would you say?
Keep writing,   
the roots are still alive!

Vegetable Verse


I have grown, but strangely ever eaten, nor written poetry inspired by, courgettes - Cucurbita pepo and known by Americans as Zucchinis - but these culinary and literary omissions are about to be put right.
Yesterday, the staff room of my workplace was briefly subjected to a vegetable invasion, colonized by courgettes, as the contents of an allotment were laid upon a work surface, up for grabs.  I chose the smallest of these ambiguous squashes - like mis-shapen bananas yet too tough and marrowy to be calld a fruit in anything other than the strictest botanical sense - and all the way home, wondered what ever I might do with it?





The solution to this Cucurbitous conundrum presented its self by means of words thrown forth by the contemplation of its unique shape and colours - though whether these squashy scribbles merit the title of poetry, I will let you be the judge. For myself, now that I have sharpened the pencil of my literary gaze sufficiently to take in an observation of  Cucurbita pepo, the only course of action left to me is now surely to break another duck with this weird and wonderful vegetable, by eating it.

Crocodilian-coloured carrot,
candle of green wax,
like the ridge-ribbed body
of a glitzy lizard,
your emeraldesque, 
viridian skin,
glitter-sprinkled
in a dew of glinting specks,
 you entice the knife
to puncture your facade 
of toughened flesh
and spill the wet,
life-lathered juices
bottled up inside.




Wednesday, 16 August 2017

Little Creatures Poetry Tour: Oct - Dec 2017


Four and a half years after its original publication, I will be celebrating the reprinting of my collection Little Creatures: Poems of Insects, Small Mammals and Micro-organisms with a short autumn tour of readings.  I am delighted to announce that these readings will be supported by poetry from Anne Caldwell, Victoria Gatehouse, Atar Hadari, and others to be confirmed - plus the regular recitals of poet, voice actor and fell-running superhero Andy Smith:  https://andyqby19.com/  

Join us this autumn for poetry and performances, the chance to buy books by all participating authors - and the opportunity of appearing in our Little Creatures film(s)!.
 Dates and information will be added over the next few weeks, and the itinerary is currently as follows:

Thursday October 12th - The Blue Teapot, Mytholmroyd.  Guest poets: Victoria Gatehouse, Anne Caldwell and Andy Smith (tickets available soon)

Tuesday, November 21st - The Fox and Goose, Hebden Bridge - Guest poet Atar Hadari. 


Saturday, 12 August 2017

Pity the Birds - my poem for the Inglorious Twelfth


PITY THE BIRDS

Pity the birds, when the guns begin
and peace is punctured by a ricochet
of cracks.  Bellies bullet-pumped,
they’ll fall like bricks in bags
from August skies to freshly-bloodied grass.

Pity the grouse, blackish, russet-smudged 
and rustling through rushes, like hook-
beaked hens eye-deep in heather,
bodies almost globular, heads crowned
with scarlet tufts.

Unsuspectingly, they will root through shoots, ingest
the juice of moorland berries, dot rural skies
like black stars bobbling over tree-tops
until the skeleton-shredding lead bursts them open
and they drop, gut-strewn, to a chorus of dull “thucks.”

Pity these innocents, naively nibbling grass and gorse,
lapping up a landscape 
slyly set against them, so big gangs of grown men 
might laughingly maraud, 
pissed on whisky by mid-afternoon 
and smashing birds to bits, 
like tantrumming schoolboys they cock their guns,
esteemed QC’s, and crooked judges, and those who own 

whole postcodes, whose grand estates are leased
for slaughter, so that birds may bear the brunt
of their shrivelled egos - blue-blooded thugs,
men so insecure they need to kill - and kill they will, 
their violent games protected by bent laws, 
ensuring harmless and defenceless birds
are shot down by the scum of England’s countryside
on the bloody afternoon of the Inglorious Twelfth.

Wednesday, 9 August 2017

Baudelaire in Hebden Bridge

I hadn't read anything at a public reading for some months, until Monday evening at The Blind Pig, Sowerby Bridge, following a fantastic reading by Keith Hutson of his latest round of biographical sonnets - widening the scope somewhat from music hall to general showbiz, with a range of characters from hapless 19th Century dancers to Bob Monkhouse.  The other guest was Phil Foster, and he read a poem about Clarke Kent, in which he wondered how CK had managed to keep schtum about his secret life as Superman, and a passionate tribute to the Kurdish people, with particular emphasis on the indomitable Kurdish women.The open mic was a jolly affair, and when it came to my turn I spoke briefly about how much I had recently enjoyed the videos and images people have been sharing from this year's Pride festivals, having only ever been to one Pride myself. In particular I liked seeing the Hebden Bridge tree,



...and its umbrella theme certainly seems fitting for this pluvial summer, drenched as August has so far been by almost continual rain.

Somewhat sunnier than our dampened shores, the island of Lesbos was the birthplace of Greek poet Sappho (c.630 - c.570 BC), and, after reading from the poetry of Payam Feili, it was this Aegean idyll that I recalled in my reading: not my own poetry, but that of the French poet Charles Baudelaire, one of my long time inspirations.  Baudelaire, whose adult life was largely defined by his continual financial struggles and ultimately unrequited love for one woman, and whose controversial book Le Fleurs du Mal (The Flowers of Evil) appeared one hundred and sixty years ago this year,  celebrated Lesbos as mother of the Latin games and the voluptuous rites of Greece, (where) kisses of languor or rapture, sun-scorching or melon-cool, / make lovelier the glorious nights and days - romanticizing its female inhabitants just as he had done in earlier poetry:

Vous que dans votre enfer mon âme a poursuivies,
Pauvres soeurs, je vous aime autant que je vous plains,
Pour vos mornes douleurs, vos soifs inassouvies,
Et les urnes d'amour dont vos grands coeurs sont pleins

 You whom my soul has followed into lairs infernal,Poor sisterhood, I pity and adore,
For your despairing griefs, your thirst eternal,
And love that floods your hearts for evermore!

(Trans. Roy Campbell)



For the socially anarchic Baudelaire, more truth-seeker than decadent, the vision of an isle of the sultry swooning nights like the myths of Delphine and Hippolyta, would evoke Utopian notions of transcendence: I can see him, penniless and bedraggled, trudging through the grime of  a Parisian winter, turning through the narrow streets and absinthe-poisoned alleyways, his tortured, tired mind drifting into dreams of the sunlit island, where kisses cascade fearless  into fathomless depths, /
sobbing or chuckling, stormy or secretive, seething or profound;/ Lesbos, where the kisses cascade down, personifying - deifying, even - the island as a queen of the realms of gentleness,/ lovable motherland, queen of the inexhaustible subtleties of loving.  With his ideological compass swinging between the revolutionary and the reactionary, and eventually settling into an almost nihilistic detachment, his religious impulses alternating wildly between Satanism and devout belief, Baudelaire simply did not fit into the defined territories of his times, and as such a great many of his poems and proclamations provoked incensed receptions, always taken literally by an easily scandalized reading public:

"There are but three beings worthy of respect: the priest, the warrior and the poet. To know, to kill and to create. The rest of mankind may be taxed and drudged, they are born for the stable, that is to say, to practise what they call professions."


Censored, prosecuted and harassed, Baudelaire would face the wrath of the authorities for his Fleurs du Mal, his artistry criminalized, his works confiscated and withheld from public view, until a shortened version of the book found publication in 1861.  Among the Pieces Condamnees - which would not legally appear until their limited Belgian publication in 1866 - was Lesbos, and in its counter-cultural reproach of Patriarchal prudery, we might find presentiments of the indignant bluster with which his own ignominy would be greeted, as the poet taunts the Gods: Let greybeard Plato frown with his reproving eye ...asking rhetorically, Lesbos, which of the gods shall presume to be your judge /if the golden scales fail to weigh the deluge of tears / your streams have poured into the sea? /
Lesbos, which of the gods shall presume to be your judge.

Baudelaire's poetry sometimes seems like a plea for beauty and truth in a world of ugliness and falsity:

Sometimes I have seen,  in a third rate theatre,
lit by the sonorous orchestra,
a fairy kindle miraculous dawn in infernal sky,

a being who was naught but light and gold
overthrow  gigantic Satan,
but my heart ...
is a theatre in which the gauze-winged being
is forever awaited in vain

at other times, it is drenched in a brooding introspection too profound to be labelled as self-pity:

I am fuller of memories than if I had lived a thousand years...

I am a graveyard that the moon abhors,
in which long worms crawl like remorses,
always battening on the dead I hold dear

in places philosophical:

This life is a hospital
in which every patient 
is obsessed with the desire to change beds 

and elsewhere, downright suicidal:

In a rich soil full of snails
I want to dig a deep ditch for myself
where I can stretch my old bones at leisure
and sleep in oblivion like a shark in the sea.


With his poems of devils, rape and vice, his blasphemy and descriptions of prostitutes, tramps, murderers and vampires - as well as his spirited defences of clandestine love - condemned by hypocrites and envious contemporaries, Baudelaire fumed against his situation in a letter to his mother:

"I have always considered that literature and the arts pursue an aim independent of morality ... But this book, whose title says everything, is clad, as you will see, in a cold and sinister beauty. It was created with rage and patience. Besides, the proof of its positive worth is in all the ill that they speak of it. The book enrages people. Moreover, since I was terrified myself of the horror that I should inspire, I cut out a third from the proofs. They deny me everything, the spirit of invention and even the knowledge of the French language. I don't care a rap about all these imbeciles, and I know that this book, with its virtues and its faults, will make its way in the memory of the lettered public."

 

I see Baudelaire stumbling in clumsy grace into Keith Hutson's pantheon of vaudevillian heroes. I imagine him centre-stage, performing sinister magic under the lamps of Covent Garden, or pulling serpents out of hats at the Batley Variety Club. I see him as neither Superman or Clarke Kent, but instead championing Lex Luther.  I can picture him in Hebden Bridge, not wining and dining but wandering the canal banks late at night, weaving starlit trysts with hash-hazed fellow travelers, composing poisoned sonnets and howling at the moon. I see him on the fringes of cities, avoiding the crowds but discreetly drinking in the atmosphere, dazzling at poetry readings but vanishing before the end. I see him on the side of the Kurdish women and today's femmes damnee of Russia, Zimbabwe, Iran and Pakistan, writing poems of protest but drifting quietly into the background, living in the world within his hallucinatory mind, a world and deity-defying delights and beautiful madness . And to be quite honest, I see him, if he were living now, very likely being just as ill-treated, just as marginalized and as misunderstood in today's  supposedly enlightened world, as he was in the turbulent atmosphere of his own turbulent times.


Thursday, 3 August 2017

Caterpillar Poetry: No Longer Associated with UNESCO

This March I co-ordinated an evening of international poetry at Morley Library, raising money for the mental health charity MIND, and also for UNESCO - the United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organization -  being timed to coincide with that body's International Day of Poetry.  On this site and on youtube, I posted videos and images in memory of the day, all of which I have taken down.
One of the things that attracted me to UNESCO was the apparent sincerity with which they seemed to support a peaceful outcome to the Israeli/Palestinian issue, and notwithstanding the various resolutions and statements they have historically passed for and against both sides, I genuinely believed that by enacting a UNESCO celebration, I was helping to support efforts aimed at secure and lasting solutions in this field.  The ins and outs of the issue was of no consequence to our event, which was based on internationalism, tolerance, and peace.  Our participants and spectators included poets and performers from the USA, Australia, Spain, Libya and many places in between.  Along with the flags of 193 other member states, those of Israel and the Palestinian territories were hung as bunting around the building.
The news a few weeks that UNESCO had passed a resolution implicitly denying any reference to the Jewish history at Jerusalem's Temple Mount, and listing the site purely by its Arab name - an act of partiality by an organization claiming to be neutral on this extremely complex matter - came as a shock to me, as did the further elements of UNESCO's biased resolution which dispute any Jewish claim to the city of Jerusalem, even describing various "so called" Jewish sites and putting inverted commas around others.  Above all, I was bemused by UNESCO's simplistic assertions, as outlined in an excellent Tablet article by Paris-based journalist Shany Mor:

UNESCO “condemns Israeli aggressions” perpetrated “against the freedom of worship and Muslims’ access to Al-Aqsa,” “deplores the continuous storming of Al-Aqsa Mosque/Al-Haram Al-Sharif by Israeli right-wing extremists,” and “deeply decries the continuous Israeli aggressions” committed by “the so-called ‘Israeli antiquities’ officials.”
There’s a long history to Arab claims that Jews or Zionists or Israelis have threatened Al-Aqsa, dating back past 1930.
The power of this lie, in inciting violence ... was first understood in the 1920s by the Mufti of Jerusalem (and future Nazi collaborator) Haj Amin al-Husseini. He saw Al-Aqsa as a way of turning a local conflict, where his side might have been at a disadvantage, into a regional, religious, and even global conflict where this disadvantage could be reversed. The claim that Jews were seeking to harm Muslim holy sites in Jerusalem in 1928 was the pretext for a wave of Arab violence against Jews, culminating in the massacre a few months later of 67 Jews in Hebron.
This served as a model for future violence following false claims of Jewish threats to Al Aqsa, which occurred roughly once a decade, particularly after Israel conquered the Old City of Jerusalem in 1967. Even during the peak years of the Oslo process, the opening in 1996 of a second exit to a tourist tunnel that (despite lies to the contrary) ran under no mosque was used as a false pretext for three days of violent rioting that included two deadly attacks on Jewish holy sites in the West Bank. Global opinion universally blamed Israel for the riots.

I have never visited the region.  I remain a strong supporter of any peaceful movement which genuinely has at its heart the security and success of both peoples, and I do not regard myself as a mouthpiece for either.  But I believe UNESCO's resolution flies in the face of this, and of history.  Mor goes on, This perceived grievance stretches the bounds of irony ... immediately after conquering the Old City, Israel handed control of the Temple Mount to the Islamic Trust, and forbade any Jewish religious rite on the entire Mount, a status quo it has maintained to this day.  The world’s only Jewish state had just scored an astonishing victory over enemies who only days earlier were promising a war of extermination against it and, in the process, liberated the Jewish people’s holiest site—and promptly handed it over.  He suggests that restrictions on access to the site are imposed on Jewish,not Muslim, visitors, and that Israeli control of the Old City in the last half century has meant that Al Aqsa, is the rare Islamic holy site not to be a stage for some kind of massacre of Muslim worshipers by one or another rival branch of radical Islam, and contrasts UNESCO's attitude to Israel with its lack of focus on other agents in the region and their impact on historical sites: The construction of the El-Marwani Mosque on the southeast corner of the Mount entailed unrecoverable destruction of archaeological treasures ranging across three millennia. Unlike the imagined archaeological damage fantasists accuse Israel of committing, this was never condemned by UNESCO or any other international body. 

I simply cannot associate myself with an organization that goes out of its way to single out individual countries - especially those caught up in interminable cycles of regional and religious conflict yet which are held to higher moral standards than would ever be expected of nations free from the concerns that states like Israel has faced  - while blithely ignoring the flaws and pitfalls of its neighbours.  Many Ancient sites have been razed to the ground in recent times, by ISIS and other forces of destruction, to resounding silences from UNESCO.
I am disappointed at this turn of events.  Along with others, I had been planning several extensive events to raise money for UNESCO over the next couple of years. I waited several weeks after the initial news, in the hope that as time went by some further statement from UNESCO might suggest they had taken the time to consider the matter somewhat less one-sidedly (as with their reversal of a cancellation on the Simon Wesenthal Centre art exhibition a few years ago), but the conclusion I have reached is that although UNESCO remains in essence an important international body (of which both Israel and Palestine are members in their own respective ways), its current stance on this matter is not conducive to peace, and is unhelpful to both Israelis and Palestinians.  As an artist I do not like to tie myself into any political organization and prefer to operate outside the ideological territory of any biased group or movement, and as such, until such a time as they modify or alter their position, a continued association with UNESCO, is not something I am pursuing.